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University of Auckland's Associate Professor Dr Natalie Walker and Professor Chris Bullen studied 1124 participants, 40 per cent of whom were Maori women. Photo / Supplied
University of Auckland's Associate Professor Dr Natalie Walker and Professor Chris Bullen studied 1124 participants, 40 per cent of whom were Maori women. Photo / Supplied
10 Sep, 2019 10:30am

A new study has discovered nicotine-filled vapes could help people give up smoking faster.

However, researchers from Lancet Respiratory Medicine say the e-cigarette had to be used in conjunction with other nicotine-based therapy - patches, gum, lozenges - to be most effective.

University of Auckland Associate Professor and lead investigator Dr Natalie Walker says the research is also significant because of the 1124 participants, 40 per cent identified as being Māori.

"The NZ Health Survey 2017/18 found more Māori women smoked daily compared to Māori men, so it was encouraging to see so many Māori women engaging in the trial in an effort to quit smoking."

The main outcome from the trial was measuring who was "smokefree" for six months.

People who used patches combined with a nicotine e-cigarette were more likely to be smokefree for that period than those who used patches combined with a nicotine-free e-cigarette.

The use of both methods was also most preferred by those who took part in the survey.

Side effects from using the products were "uncommon and decreased with time", she said.

As for whether vaping was safe, Dr Walker said vaping was a harm-reduction tool to help people dying from smoking tobacco.

"Vaping is less harmful than smoking.

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